Creating an underpainting with Starch

A fun way to establish an outline image on which to build further layers is by manipulating paint with spray starch.

Take a look of the stages of my Finished painting “Summer Shimmer”:

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Here are the stages:

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Stage 1:

The canvas was sprayed lightly with spray starch and a variety of paint and pigment was applied (liquid acrylics, air brush colour, acrylic inks and Brusho granules. This was then sprayed with another layer of starch.

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Stage 2:

A sheet of polythene was placed over the canvas and left to dry.

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Stage 3:

When the polythene was removed, although the colours had faded slightly, the process left a beautiful underpainting with lots of different textures (caused by the reaction of the starch with the different paint mediums) on which to build a painting.

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Stage 4:

Collage elements where added to the piece and more paint was added to reveal the flower heads.

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Final stage:

More adjustments were carried out on the vase and the background to produce the finished work.

http://www.helenkaminsky.co.uk

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Cropping artwork

More old paintings found that didn’t really work for me, so using my two L-shaped pieces of mountboard I played around to crop them into pleasing compositions and hey presto I now have new artworks to mount and sell:

The chosen format:
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The chosen format:

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The chosen format:

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http://www.helenkaminsky.co.uk

Mark-Making Nostalgia

Having a clear out today whilst the rain is battering outside (yes, its July, and its the UK). Came across some old experiments with mark-making tools, some of which I’d totally forgotten:

Using all sorts of things from lego, toy train tracks, corks, bottle tops, sequin waste, stencils, toy cog wheels and stamps to name but a few.

And, here are some of them put onto various types of paper with other random marks and formed into collages:

Then using two L-shaped pieces of mountboard, I floated them over the work to see where they could be cropped to create a pleasing piece of art:

Interesting to see how the dynamics of the pieces change, so now all I need to do is to make a decision on which version works the best, and how to crop, mmmmm……..

These are the ones I chose:

I found that I was particularly drawn to a square format with these creations, so now to get them mounted and ready for sale.

Hope you found this an interesting way to re-look at old artwork. More to come…

http://www.helenkaminsky.co.uk

The Creation of Mac McGuiness

During a wonderful art retreat at EOM (Essence of Mulranny Studios), Co. Mayo, Ireland, we were fortunate enough to visit a thriving goat sanctuary dedicated to saving the endangered, indigenous Irish Goat.

Here are the 4 stages of the creation of Mac McGuiness, in mixed media, collage and encaustic wax.

And here is a cheeky little collaged ‘fella’ that I donated to the Sanctuary:

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And, a few shots of the real thing:

They were so adorable, so more goat paintings to come…..

http://www.helenkaminsky.co.uk

http://www.essenceofmulranny.com

Local Scenes

Have started a series of local scenes around Congleton and Staffs for a forthcoming exhibition at The Foxlowe Gallery Café, Leek in March. Three done and more to go………………………. Its amazing once you start the options that pop into your head. These 3 below depict Bosley Cloud, a well known and well travelled landmark in Congleton, Cheshire.